Home > Monthly Archives: January 2012
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Using HTML5 to Determine User Location

Geolocation is one of the most exciting features offered by HTML5. Using some relatively simple JavaScript code, you can create Web applications that determine various aspects of the user location, including longitude, latitude and altitude plus more. Some Web applications can even provide navigation functionality by monitoring the user position over time, integrating with map systems such as Google Maps API. As with all HTML5 functions, you cannot yet rely on browser support. Where browser...
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Developing a Responsive Website: The Homepage Portfolio Slider

We are going to continue on with our designing a responsive website tutorial where we have already learned about the background images, the site's navigation and the content. This week we’re going to work on adding a little more content to our homepage. At this point you should have a site that looks similar to this. You should have a full-screen background image that changes in size to match the viewers screen resolution, a main navigation bar, and a little blurb that will grab the attention of the viewer...
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PHP Arrays: Array Functions and Multidimensional Arrays

In Part I, we looked at simple arrays, as well as how to loop through and sort array elements.  In this article, we will look at other array functions as well as multidimensional arrays. The difference between one-dimensional and multidimensional arrays is a simple one: a multidimensional array is a simple array that has simple arrays as elements, rather than strings or scalar variables. Building a Multidimensional Array Here is how our $arrBooks example from last week’s article can be expanded...
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Responsive Widgets

Responsive design is a hot topic of web development these days, and with a simple (and now well supported) way of handling the ‘one site for all clients’ model (and I mean clients as in browsers/platforms/devices, not the people that give you money in return for a web site) it should well be. Redirecting mobile users to /m/ or some other cut-down area of your site is becoming a technique of the past. Using collections of utilities, such as the excellent 320&up, makes building responsively much...
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Developing a Responsive Website Part 2: Navigation and Content

Now that we’ve got our background images squared away and set to break themselves down nicely across various devices and screen resolutions we can look in to populating our home page with some content. Let’s begin with our header. I always like using a separate file for all the things that will stay uniform throughout my site, header, logo, navigation, etc. That way if I need to make a minor edit down the road I just have to edit the header file, which is then pulled in to every page with a simple PHP include...
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SEO for Web Developers Part 2

Some experts say search only drives 30 percent of a website’s traffic. While that may seem insignificant, that 30 percent often makes up visitors who are looking for the products, services or information specific to your company so losing them could have a significant impact on how well an organization performs. In part one of this series we looked at some things that web developers need to consider when it comes to search engine optimization, but now it’s time to step up to the plate. Let’s roll...
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XML Schema (XSD): Using Compositors

In XML, you can use XSDs to define markup structures in varying levels of detail. Compositors are among the many XSD structures you can choose from when specifying your XML content models. The XML Schema standard supports three different compositor types, each of which indicates restrictions on the range and ordering of elements. In general terms, a compositor dictates (or describes) the composition of child elements within a parent element in an XML data source. Compositors often appear within...
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Developing a Responsive Website: Background Images

A while back we took A Look at Responsive Web Design and how different designers utilize it in different ways.  Now that we’ve seen a few examples in action, let’s create a responsive website of our own.  In this installment we’re going to set up the structure of our homepage and add in a few media queries that will help the site load quicker, navigate better, and keep our desired appearance across multiple devices, platforms, and resolutions. Before we dive in to the HTML, let’s cover the “viewport”...
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