Articles by Ezequiel Bruni

Ezequiel Bruni is a web/UX designer, blogger, and aspiring photographer living in Mexico. When he's not up to his finely-chiselled ears in wire-frames and front-end code, or ranting about the same, he indulges in beer, pizza, fantasy novels, and stand-up comedy.

9 Ways To Calibrate Your Monitor

What you see may be what you get, but it's not necessarily what everyone else gets. I was reminded of this when I bought a gaming monitor. I'd originally intended to get a 4K monitor of some kind, but I decided to go for speed over size. The one I did get can render my games at a brisk 144hz, and my games have never looked better. Well, they looked good after I finally got my color calibration worked out. It took a while, as I was out of practice, but after finding my monitor's ICC profile and eyeballing the calibration...

Gravit releases ProjectX

Look out Canva! There are a ton of new players in town! Well, not in town so much as “probably on their way”. Maybe. We hope. Basically, the guys behind Gravit, a fantastic web-based image and vector editor, went and built a demo version of a Canva-like web app that they called ProjectX. It really is a demo. It only supports one image size (851 x 315px, the size of a Facebook cover), and really doesn’t have much in the way of features. What makes it very, very cool is the fact that it was built with around...

Snyk: the easy way to find code vulnerabilities

Security in programming is essential, and a massive headache. As the things that people build become more sophisticated and complex, their code bases get bigger and bigger. With that extreme growth comes an increasing number of potential weak points in any project’s security. Factor in dependencies (bits of code handled by third-party programmers which they have shared out of the kindness of their hearts), and you’re looking at more code then you could ever practically revisit. In this case,...

Understanding coders via humor

Programmers and designers—and nerds in general, really—can be kind of difficult for non-nerdy people to understand. The reverse is also true. Programmer types can get the worst of it, though. Generalizing broadly, the mental world they tend to live in is full of things that make sense because they follow specific rules. Those rules can get infinitely complex; but the basic principles of programming can get you past most of the problems you might encounter. It was probably a misplaced semicolon,...

Shutterstock builds machine learning into its search

There’s good news for everyone who uses stock photos, today: finding the right one just got easier. That is, if you use Shutterstock. Shutterstock is taking a page from the Google Images play-book by implementing a reverse image search. Then, they took it a step further by giving us “visually similar” search. Really, most of what you need to know is right in the names. Anyone who has dragged a photo into Google Images to find the original source knows what I’m talking about. Now, you can do the same...

StringBean: The tiny framework for big design

StringBean introduces itself with the slogan, “The 4K featherweight framework”. Now, I wasn’t exactly skeptical. Despite the prevalence of massive CSS and HTML frameworks (you know which two I mean), there are plenty of tiny frameworks about. I’ve seen and tested many, and even used one or two of them for live projects. StringBean has, however, managed to impress me with how much it’s managed to fit into a small space. As always, frameworks stay small by sticking to an incredibly basic set...

User-friendly front-end: Emmet Livestyle

Do you feel comfortable in a text editor, but not so much in the terminal? Then this might be the series for you! In User-friendly front-end articles, I’ll be outlining ways to streamline the front-end development process in ways that don’t involve terminals, compilers, or endless chains of libraries. Don’t get me wrong, those things are great. However, we’re not all full-time developers. It can take more time to figure out which libraries to use, how to make them build properly, and so on,...

Introducing cory, the tiny static-site generator

We DIY types do love our tiny scripts, frameworks, and CMSs, sometimes. There’s something about starting from near-scratch, with some of the annoying stuff taken out of the equation, that feels amazing. There’s so much potential on that blank screen, or in that empty text file. Today, I’m talking about cory, which bills itself as a “tiny generator for static sites”. It’s Node-based, and it lives up to this promise. The source code for the whole thing, when zipped, weighs in at just 235KB....
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