HTML5 and CSS3 Form Validation

In HTML5 forms got a major upgrade with the addition of some simple, yet flexible validation attributes. To support these added attributes CSS3 also added several new pseudo selectors styling controls based on their validation state. Adding validation To illustrate the new attributes and some of the new input types, we'll be building up a simple sign up form. Every sign up form is essentially the same, you fill in your details and click submit. How many times has the form been reset on you after you've...
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Creating a Completely Customized Google Map Plugin for jQuery

Last week I briefly touched on the customization possibilities of Google Maps, this week we'll be taking a more in depth look at what exactly you can customize. The options available include customization for all aspects of the map such as: Roads Points of Interest e.g. Schools, Parks and Hospitals Methods of Transport Water Landscape features e.g. Man made or Natural This covers not only custom colors, but the icons and text associated with each element. Getting Started This tutorial is a follow on...
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Adding a custom icon to a Google Maps Marker

I've used the Google Maps API a few times over the last while and one thing that I've never really touched on is it's fantastic customization options. You can pretty much style or customize everything. In this quick post I'll show you how to change the default marker (or pin) to something else. This is handy if you want to display your company logo or some other icon on the map. I'll also detail the other configurable options that you can change in the google.maps.Marker class. Getting Started We saw earlier...
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HTML5 Geo-location API and Google Maps API

In this weeks tutorial we'll be creating a jQuery plugin that serves as an introduction to the HTML5 Geo-location API to request your current location. Once we have the location, we will then draw a route from there to Dublin, Ireland (or wherever you tell it to) using the Google Maps API. This could be used in a HTML5 web application or on a site to tell your customers how to get to you. Getting Started First of all we'll need to create our jQuery plugin wrapper. The $.extend function will allow us to provide...
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Adding custom next/previous post buttons to WordPress using Font Awesome

The default WordPress theme (TwentyTwelve) comes with a pretty standard previous/next post function for the theme. I don't particularly like the links as they feel a little forgotten about and they could easily be so much more. This snippet will show you how to create a custom navigation function and we'll be using Font Awesome to add some icons. Adding Font Awesome Font Awesome is quite literally awesome. It's a collection of over 360 icons presented as a font. This means you can easily add it to any web...
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Automatically generating a table of contents with a smooth scroll effect

Ever written a long article worthy of a table of contents and decided not to do it because it's just too much hassle? This week we'll be writing a jQuery plugin that will automatically search for your headings and create a table of contents based on them for your blog post. We'll also be adding a smooth scroll effect, so that when a user clicks on an entry they are brought to the right section. I know a table of contents is a bit of an unusual topic for a tutorial, but if you're writing a help file for your product,...
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Using jQuery to add a dynamic “Back To Top” floating button with smooth scroll

Ever read a really long blog post or article and then had to scroll all the way up to the top of the screen to get to the menu? It can be a little frustrating. It's easy to fix, you can have a fixed menu or as you'll see here you can provide a quick and stylish way to get back to the top. Getting Started HTML wise all we need to do is add a "back to top" link at the bottom of the blog post <a href="#" class="back-to-top">Back to Top</a> We then need to style and position it. Here I'm setting its position to fixed...
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Adding a “You might also like” overlay to another WordPress post using scroll events

How do you encourage users to stay on your site and how do you let them know about the rest of the great content you have on your site? If a user has read or is reading and article on your site, they may like to know about similar content. You could have a series of thumbnails or related articles, but why not give a specific post a little more priority? In this tutorial we'll be using jQuery to detect when the user has scrolled to or near the bottom of the article. Once they are near it, we'll display a small overlay...
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