Articles by Ezequiel Bruni

Ezequiel Bruni is a web/UX designer, blogger, and aspiring photographer living in Mexico. When he's not up to his finely-chiselled ears in wire-frames and front-end code, or ranting about the same, he indulges in beer, pizza, fantasy novels, and stand-up comedy.

Shutterstock builds machine learning into its search

There’s good news for everyone who uses stock photos, today: finding the right one just got easier. That is, if you use Shutterstock. Shutterstock is taking a page from the Google Images play-book by implementing a reverse image search. Then, they took it a step further by giving us “visually similar” search. Really, most of what you need to know is right in the names. Anyone who has dragged a photo into Google Images to find the original source knows what I’m talking about. Now, you can do the same...

StringBean: The tiny framework for big design

StringBean introduces itself with the slogan, “The 4K featherweight framework”. Now, I wasn’t exactly skeptical. Despite the prevalence of massive CSS and HTML frameworks (you know which two I mean), there are plenty of tiny frameworks about. I’ve seen and tested many, and even used one or two of them for live projects. StringBean has, however, managed to impress me with how much it’s managed to fit into a small space. As always, frameworks stay small by sticking to an incredibly basic set...

User-friendly front-end: Emmet Livestyle

Do you feel comfortable in a text editor, but not so much in the terminal? Then this might be the series for you! In User-friendly front-end articles, I’ll be outlining ways to streamline the front-end development process in ways that don’t involve terminals, compilers, or endless chains of libraries. Don’t get me wrong, those things are great. However, we’re not all full-time developers. It can take more time to figure out which libraries to use, how to make them build properly, and so on,...

Introducing cory, the tiny static-site generator

We DIY types do love our tiny scripts, frameworks, and CMSs, sometimes. There’s something about starting from near-scratch, with some of the annoying stuff taken out of the equation, that feels amazing. There’s so much potential on that blank screen, or in that empty text file. Today, I’m talking about cory, which bills itself as a “tiny generator for static sites”. It’s Node-based, and it lives up to this promise. The source code for the whole thing, when zipped, weighs in at just 235KB....

Shopify launches a WordPress plugin

That’s right WordPress-lovers! This one’s for you. The dream of many a startup is to sell stuff online. I mean, it sounds great, right? The website handles half the work, and you just send the stuff out. If your goods are electronic, you may never have to deal directly with the customer. You know, unless something goes wrong... but I digress. Many online vendors, preferring the familiar comfort of the WordPress admin interface, have turned to plugins to provide them with the e-commerce functionality...
CSS

Will CSS Houdini revolutionize web development?

Browser development has often seemed like an endless cycle of disappointment for wed developers. A new standard is recommended, and maybe one browser implements it as a feature. It looks cool. But we can’t allow ourselves to get excited... not yet. That way lies pain, sadness, and five years to a decade of waiting for the feature to become viable. Remember how long it took us just to get working transparent .PNGs in every browser? Yeah. That took a while. Well, that could all be changed in a big way, sort...

Underappreciated frameworks part 5: Outline

This is a part of the Under-appreciated series, where we explore CSS frameworks that are well-made and have great ideas, but never took off like the “big two”. For a full introduction, see the first article in the series. Outline bills itself as "The clean and simple framework". Clean? Simple? You have my attention! Really, though, Outline is a pretty basic, SASS-based framework. Now, if you’ve read this series, you know that’s not an issue. Basic can be very useful. The question is, as always:...

Getting started with Middleman

WordPress and other CMS’ like it have taught us well that not every site needs to be dynamic. In fact, it can be hell on the server. So, just about every decent coder out there has taken a stab at making a static site generator. This is a good thing. If they keep this up, we may one day have one that’s user-friendly. For now, they are decidedly developer-centric, and somewhat experimental. At this stage, they are fascinating. Today’s offering is the appropriately named Middleman, and it’s built...
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