best practices posts

SEO, HTML and Web Site Architecture

With hundreds of millions of users entering hundreds of billions of queries into major search engines such as Google, Yahoo and Bing, the importance of designing a site to be search-engine friendly cannot be underestimated. However, even the most experienced designers and developers can make simple mistakes that can cost their site thousands of views and (potentially) uncounted revenues. HTML Issues ... Sometimes, the “old-fashioned” methods are still the most effective. While many SEO...
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Baking a New Site With a Sprinkle of SEO Part 2

In part one of Baking a New Site With a Sprinkle of SEO, we covered some of the more important things a developer can do to help their sites find their way into the top positions of the search engines. This week, we look at more advanced steps you can take to really help catapult them up to the top. Advanced: canonical tags ... You may have heard about Google’s recent algorithm updates such as Panda and Penguin. Well, one of things Panda concerned its self about was not how much sugar cane it was getting,...
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Displaying the Progress of Tasks with HTML5

With the progress element, HTML5 pages can display the progress of a task, for example a download or background activity. In this tutorial we will demonstrate how to use the progress element in your pages, with a simple JavaScript function updating the element as the task executes. At the moment the progress element is only really supported in Firefox, Chrome and Opera, with support developing in Internet Explorer and Safari, so you can't rely on it just yet. For demonstration, we are simply going to...
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Common PHP File Upload Restrictions

From family photos to business documents, file uploads power many of the major web applications. A typical HTML form that allows the user to upload a file may look like this: <html> <body> <form action="upload_file.php" method="post" enctype="multipart/form-data"> File Name: <input type="file" name="file" id="file" />  <br /> <input type="submit" name="submit" value="Submit" /> </form> </body> </html> In this case, the...
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Introduction to Sass, Part II

In my last post, I introduced Sass (Syntactically Awesome Stylesheets) and getting Sass set up on your machine by installing Ruby, installing Sass, watching a file and compiling via Terminal. Now, we will look at a much simpler way to get set up with Sass. CodeKit. I'll be upfront, I'm a user of CodeKit and I recommend the software to any web developer who works in Sass, LESS, Compass, JavaScript, or any other web language, however neither I nor Developer Drive has any relationship (personal or financial)...
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Learning LESS: Put It Into Action

We'll finish our Learning LESS series today as we talk about putting your LESS into action on your web projects. Today's post will be slightly different than previous posts, as we won't really showcase new techniques and code examples as much as we'll talk about how to use LESS, projects you can work on to jump start your LESS development and more. Blog Series Roadmap ... An Introduction Using Variables Using Mixins Using Nested Rules Using Functions Divide and Conquer Put It Into Action Coding With...
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Learning LESS: Divide and Conquer

We're getting to the end of our Learning LESS series, and this is one of the posts I'm most excited about. One of the best features of LESS is how modular and organized your code can be, and how it doesn't add much weight or calls to your live sites (if you compile locally with LESS.app, CodeKit or some other compiler). Blog Series Roadmap ... An Introduction Using Variables Using Mixins Using Nested Rules Using Functions Divide and Conquer Put It Into Action Grab a cup o' joe, your favorite text editor and...
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5 Differences Between C# and Java: Data Types

The line between desktop development and web-based applications has been all but obliterated in the last few years. With the advent of smartphones, especially Google’s Java-based Android operating system, developers are scrambling to jump onto the newest technology, while fearing that the skills they have cultivated over the years may become obsolete. Many former C++ and C# programmers are migrating their way to Java applications. While the languages are remarkably similar (as Java was built...
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